Essay Cove

Essay Cove

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Hello! I have to write a literature review for my Sociology class titled Housing Affordability. I am looking to explore the implications of respectability politics in legal outcomes in housing court, and how that my encompass racialized or classist iterations of injustice. I am hoping to write the paper using an abolitionist framework to analyzeracial and socioeconomic intersections of power and how they are manifested in housing court and through evictions. I have a rough draft of the introduction written to guide you in the right direction, and the sources that need to be used are provided in the syllabus. This is a literature review, and there must be explicit reference to every single source that is on the course syllabus, as well as the additional sources I will provide. Below is my working introduction:
The way one might speak with their friends over a picnic does not mirror the dynamics that take place in a classroom or in the workplace. Human interaction is brimming with norms that we often thoughtlessly default to, and these paradigms carry implications that should not be lost on us– truths about power and privilege, histories of oppression, and iterations of cyclical inequities. Exploring the expectations for communication in housing court is essential to our understanding of the legal outcomes in these trials. Everything from courtroom decorum, speaking order, legal jargon, and the attire one wears to court matters for our conception of what a trial looks like, and these patterns serve as remnants to elitist and racist practices that continue to reproduce inequitable realities via respectability politics. An abolitionist approach to housing justice is contingent upon the postulation of housing as a right, as opposed to a privilege or commodity. Ultimately, an intersectional framework that accounts for notions of race and class is imperative to answering the question that guides this research: In what ways do respectability politics in housing court challenge or contribute to an abolitionist reimagining of housing justice?
These are some sources I plan to use, in addition to the ones necessitated by the syllabus, which is attached along with the instructions:
Mary Pattillo. (2013) Housing: Commodity versus Right. Annual Review of Sociology, 39(1): 509-531.
Matthew Desmond and Monica Bell. 2015. Housing, Poverty, and the Law. Annual Review of Law and Social Science, 11(1): 15-35.
Sophie House & Krystle Okafor, Under One Roof: Building an Abolitionist Approach to Housing Justice, N.Y.U. J. Legis. & Pub. Pol’y Quorum (2020)
Cohen, C. (2004). DEVIANCE AS RESISTANCE: A New Research Agenda for the Study of Black Politics. Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race, 1(1), 27-45. doi:10.1017/S1742058X04040044

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